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Dr. Paul Sugarbaker Explains Appendix Cancer Treatment with CRS and HIPEC





In today's featured video, Dr. Paul Sugarbaker describes refinement and management of medical treatment for PSM and GI/Colorectal cancer patients through multi disciplinary care, including CRS and HIPEC.

Peritoneal Surface Malignancies include Appendiceal Cancer, Mesothelioma, Ovarian Cancer, "PMP" and additional diagnoses.

Dr. Sugarbaker explains how CRS with HIPEC treatment programs are being implemented around the world.


View Dr. Sugarbaker's informative video>


 
 
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Tips for Returning to Work After Appendix Cancer Surgery

By PMP Pal member, Adele





Our Pal Patient, Elizabeth, has recuperated from CRS with HIPEC and is returning to her job soon.

Today she asked her fellow Pals for helpful suggestions for returning to the office

Pal Mentor, Adele, came forward to offer the following suggestions:

“Be realistic about what you can accomplish during the day.

Ask your supervisor for flexibility in your work schedule while you transition back into your working life.

Bring hand sanitizer and Lysol to work with you and use them.

Avoid anyone who has a cold or a cough!

Bring nutritious, high protein, small meals and snacks so that you can eat a little throughout the day.

For women, consider carrying a smaller, lighter handbag!

Dress comfortably. When selecting shoes, choose safety and comfort over style.

Be careful about lifting anything heavy.

Your surgeon will advise you of weight limitations. Ask for assistance in opening heavy doors

Be realistic about what you can accomplish during the day.

If you find yourself becoming tired over what were previously routine tasks, like walking from the parking lot or from one building to another, pace yourself, remember that your body is still healing, and allow yourself extra time for routine tasks, if needed.

Ask your supervisor for flexibility in your work schedule while you transition back into your working life.

Your colleagues and coworkers will be happy to see you back on the job and will likely want to assist you in any way they can…let them!”



Articles posted in PMP Pals and on www.pmppals.org are written from the perspective of patients and family caregivers and are not intended to substitute for licensed, professional legal or medical advice. Each patient’s case is unique; therefore consult with a licensed professional regarding your specific needs. Copyright © 2013 by PMP Pals’ Network. All rights reserved. Todos derechos reservados.

Visit us on the web at www.pmppals.org
We have HOPE for YOU!



 
 
Is it worth it to have Appendix Cancer Surgery?

CL from the USA asks:

“I am scheduled for CRS and HIPEC this summer. I am scared to death about this surgery. What I've read on the “support group” message boards makes it seem pretty scary. Is it worth it to have this surgery?”

PMP Pals responds:

“We understand your concerns, as nearly every patient participant *in the PMP Pals’ Network is a “veteran” of the medical procedure that has been scheduled for you.

We also understand your hesitancy after reading postings from online “forums” and “blogs.” The PMP Pals’ Network neither hosts nor endorses any of these online “support group.”

While “veteran” Pal participants fully understand the challenges of preparing for and recuperating from surgery, we embrace the philosophy that recuperation is a temporary challenge and one that will be overcome during the coming weeks and months. We choose to promote a positive attitude towards modern medical treatment, as is evidenced by the legions of smiling faces posted throughout www.pmppals.org

In effect, through surgery, you will be exchanging a few weeks of discomfort, in exchange for years of improved health. This has been the experience of the overwhelming majority of our fellow Pal Patients!

Our Pal Mentors (as we describe those veteran patients who have successfully recuperated and have been trained and specifically selected to assist you based on your common needs and demographics) will all communicate with you directly via your personal email, telephone calls and visits. Your personal questions and concerns will not be “broadcasted” throughout the internet.

Our blog articles reflect the optimism and encouragement of our international cadre of Pal Blog authors. Our program participants are diverse and include patients in 50 countries; therefore, it is possible to “connect” with others with whom you truly have something in common besides a rare diagnosis!

Please refer to the following Pal Photo Galleriesfor examples of Pal participants who say “yes, it is worth it to have this surgery!”

Appendix Cancer Survivors

HIPEC Patient Profiles

Pals’ Family Support Services




Articles posted in
PMP Pals and on www.pmppals.org are written from the perspectives of patients and their families and are not intended to substitute for licensed, professional legal or medical advice. Each patient is unique and should seek specific counsel from their own licensed healthcare professional. Copyright © 2012 by the PMP Pals’ Network. All rights reserved.

*Pal members also include family and friends of Pal Patients; they are referred to as “Pal Caregivers.”